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Stick Style

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Features Include:

  • Rectangular shape
  • Wood siding
  • Steep, gabled roof
  • Overhanging eaves
  • Ornamental trusses (gable braces)
  • Decorative braces and brackets
  • Decorative half-timbering
  • Jerkinhead dormers

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 History:

The most important features of Stick Style houses are on the exterior wall surfaces. Instead of three-dimensional ornamentation, the emphasis is on patterns and lines. Because the decorative details are flat, they are often lost when homeowners remodel. If the decorative stick work is covered up with vinyl siding or painted a single solid color, a Stick Style Victorian may appear plain and rather ordinary.

The Palliser Company, which published many plan books during the Victorian era, called stick architecture plain yet neat, modern, and comfortable. However, Stick was a short-lived fashion. The angular and austere style couldn't compete with the fancy Queen Annes that took America by storm. Some Stick architecture did dress up in fancy Eastlake spindles and Queen Anne flourishes. But very few authentic Stick Style homes remain intact. 

 

Sources:
McAlester, Virginia and Lee. A Field Guide To American Houses. New York, Alfred A. Knopf: 1984.
“House Styles, Picture Dictionary of Houses in North America and Beyond” About .com. Mar 1 2013 <architecture.about.com/od/periodsstyles/ig/House-Styles/>
Architectural Style Wikipedia. Mar 1 2013. <en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Architectural_style>

 

 

 

Last modified on Tuesday, 04 October 2016 04:10
Mark Smith

Thank you for visiting my website. My name is Mark Smith and my design company is located in Stevensville, Michigan where I reside with my wife and two children. 

About

Thank you for visiting my website. My name is Mark Smith and I reside in Stevensville, Michigan my wife and two children. I have been interested in Architecture since my boyhood days; however, because of my families business—a lumberyard—I never really got a chance to pursue my dream until later in my career. Read more...

 

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