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Victorian

Victorian

 Victorian – Eastlake, Folk, Queen Anne, Second Empire, Shingle, Stick

The Victorian style was prevalent in the United States from 1879 to 1910. The first Victorian structures appeared in Los Angeles around the mid-1880s.

The Victorian style is largely the product of the railroads and the industrial revolution. The elaborate turned and carved wooden decorative elements emblematic of this style were make inexpensive by the development of the assembly line and the steam engine. Therefore, even relatively modest homes could sport elaborate decoration.

 

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Queen Anne

Queen Anne

Of all the Victorian house styles, Queen Anne is the most elaborate and the most eccentric. The style is often called romantic and feminine, yet it is the product of a most unromantic era -- the machine age.

 

 

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Eastlake

Eastlake

These fanciful Victorian houses are lavished with Eastlake style spindle work.

 

 

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Shingle Style

Shingle Style

Rambling and asymmetrical Shingle Style homes became popular along North America's Atlantic coast.

 

 

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Stick Style

Stick Style

Stick Style Victorian houses have exposed trusses, "stickwork," and other details borrowed from the middle ages.

 

 

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Second Empire

Second Empire

With tall mansard roofs and wrought iron cresting, Second Empire homes are inspired by the opulent architecture of France during the reign of Napoleon III.

 

 

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Folk Victorian

Folk Victorian

As the industrial age made machine-cut wood details affordable and available to the average American, homeowners added mass-produced decorative trim (called gingerbread) to their small, simple folk cottages to dress them up in the style of the day.

 

 

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About

Thank you for visiting my website. My name is Mark Smith and I reside in Stevensville, Michigan my wife and two children. I have been interested in Architecture since my boyhood days; however, because of my families business—a lumberyard—I never really got a chance to pursue my dream until later in my career. Read more...

 

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