Profile

Layout

Cpanel

Mansart, Francois

Chateau de Maisons

Château de Maisons, Paris France

François Mansart, (1598–1666), was a French architect credited with introducing classicism into Baroque architecture of France. The Encyclopædia Britannica cites him as the most accomplished of 17th-century French architects whose works "are renowned for their high degree of refinement, subtlety, and elegance. His work is noted as being an outstanding expression of French classical design. In 1635 he was commissioned by the duc d'Orléans to make additions to the château of Blois. That same year he designed the Hôtel de la Vrillière, which for a long time served as a classic model for the elegant Paris house. Mansart began construction of the Church of Val-de-Grâce and finished the lower part before the commission was transferred to Lemercier. The best surviving examples of Mansart's work are the château of Maisons and, in Paris, the alterations of the Hôtel Carnavalet, now a museum.

Mansart, as he is generally known, made extensive use of a four-sided, double slope gambrel roof punctuated with windows on the steeper lower slope, creating additional habitable space in the garrets that ultimately became named after him—the mansard roof.

The Château de Maisons was built between the Seine and the forest of Saint-Germain-en-Laye, with its garden front oriented to the southeast. Originally it comprised the garden, a small park of 33 hectares and a large outer park of 300 hectares. The visitor arrived by one of two avenues that crossed in a T intersection before the gate to the cour d'honneur The principal central axis led to the forest, the cross axis through the village to the southwest and to the river, thence on to Paris. Three gateways stood at the far ends of the avenues.

On one side and the other of the avant-cour, Mansart constructed the stables, masterworks of architecture whose monumental character gave a preview of those that would be built at Versailles and Chantilly. Of these works there exists only a grotto, that served also to water the horses.

The château stood on a rectangular platform outlined in the French manner with a dry moat. The cour d'honneur was defined by terraces. The central block extends symmetrically into short wings, composed of several sections, each with its own roofline, with raked roofs and tall chimney stacks, in several ranges, with a broken façade reminiscent of the planning in work of Pierre Lescot and Philibert Delorme in the preceding century. The single pile construction typical of its epoch carries three storeys, a basement supporting a ground floor and piano nobile with three attic floors above.

Major Architectural Work:

Source

http://www.infoplease.com/biography/architects.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ch%C3%A2teau_de_Maisons

 

About

Thank you for visiting my website. My name is Mark Smith and I reside in Stevensville, Michigan my wife and two children. I have been interested in Architecture since my boyhood days; however, because of my families business—a lumberyard—I never really got a chance to pursue my dream until later in my career. Read more...

 

Who's Online

We have 132 guests and no members online